Specs summary

Screen
8.3"

The Lenovo Thinkpad 8's screen is 8.3 inches with 1200 x 1920 pixels resolution.

Processor
2.4 GHz

There is a Intel Z3770 Quad core 2.4 GHz processor (CPU).

OS

The tablet runs on the Windows 8.1 operating system (OS).

Camera
8+ MP
You can take photos or capture video with the tablet's onboard 8+ megapixel camera. There is also a secondary front facing camera with 2+ megapixels resolution.
Storage
32/64/128 GB

Internal memory is 32/64/128 GB. An external, MicroSD, MicroSDHC (up to 32 GB) expansion slot is available for increased storage capacity.

Battery
20WHr

The tablet is powered by a Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion), 20 WHr battery.



It’s a shame that overall the ThinkPad 8 is about the have-nots rather than the haves.

- Saqib Shah , What Mobile 


Lenovo's $400 Windows tablet would be pretty slick if not for several software nuisances.

- Jared Newman , Techland 

Reviews summary

7.4/10AVG.
RATING
Based on 13 reviews

What's good

  • Crisp, vibrant display
  • Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Micro-HDMI port
  • Great build quality

What's bad

  • Below-average battery life
  • Lack of stylus
  • No gaming or heavy multitasking capabilitie
  • Camera concerns

The 8-inch Windows tablet market is growing by leaps and bounds. This device aims to be the flagship device for Lenovo and set a new bar for performance in the 8-inch market. Reviews of the device are superb overall with Brian Westover of PC Magazine calling it, “the perfect device to slip into your coat pocket, letting you walk away from your desk without having to step away from important work.” David Pierce of The Verge says that “it’s the perfect size for a Windows 8 tablet.”

However, some reviewers question the viability of an 8-inch tablet for any real productivity uses. Scott Stein of CNET says, “you could argue that 8 inches is a downright weird territory for an OS that really still wants to be a full computer operating system.” Peter Bright of Ars Technica notes that, “The 8-inch screen isn't big enough for any kind of comfortable extended desktop usage.”

These points are entirely about the size of the screen. Reviews agree that the clarity and color of the 8-inch IPS touchscreen is top notch. Kevin Lee of TechRadar states, “The higher-resolution screen is by far the biggest selling point that makes the Lenovo ThinkPad 8 stand above the rest of the competition.” PC Magazine praised the viewing angles of the device, stating, “The screen offers rich colors and wide viewing angles—nearly 180-degrees.”

Show more

Powered by an Intel Atom processor and Intel Graphics chipset, reviews indicate that the tablet does excellent for basic productivity tasks, web browsing and other light activities, even when multitasking. However, numerous reviews, including that of CNET mention that you should not “expect to do any serious gaming or graphics work.”

A lack of built-in keyboard or stylus support also discouraged a few reviewers. David Pierce of The Verge says, “This device is first and foremost a tablet, and really only becomes something else with the right add-ons and accessories” but also mentions that he “constantly missed having a stylus that worked.” Scott Stein of CNET mentions, “If you think of the ThinkPad 8 as a little computer in your pocket that can pair with keyboard and monitor into a full connected device back at home, you'll probably love this.”

Unfortunately, there appear to be a few other considerations as well. Many reviews noted a lack of clarity and stability with the built-in 8MP camera. Kevin Lee of TechRadar experienced numerous crashes and issues before installing an update available through Lenovo. He stated, ““Even with the update in place, though, the camera is still quite buggy.”

Another consideration is battery life. All reviews noted a lack of battery life from the device due to the increased power requirements of the Atom processor. Most sites found running times between seven and nine hours on average before needing a charge. CNET went as far as to note, “Don't pick the ThinkPad 8 if you want the best battery life.”

Overall, reviews indicate that if you are looking for a media consumption device with productivity capabilities, or a solid small-format Windows 8 tablet, this device is a sound choice. The Verge said, “For all other normal tablet things, the ThinkPad 8 is as good as any device I’ve used.” Kevin Lee sums up many reviews by saying, “the ThinkPad 8 is pricier than most tablets in its class. But if you're a Windows fan, this high-end tablet is well worth the extra cash.”


Reviews (7.4/10 Avg. rating)


What Mobile

Plenty of built-in productivity apps but comparatively expensive

from What Mobile

From a buyer’s perspective, it all comes down to what you will use your tablet for. If you just want a device for general tasks (i.e. web browsing, social networking, gaming, etc) then you can find better alternatives within Lenovo’s Yoga range of Android slates, and elsewhere. If you...More

From a buyer’s perspective, it all comes down to what you will use your tablet for. If you just want a device for general tasks (i.e. web browsing, social networking, gaming, etc) then you can find better alternatives within Lenovo’s Yoga range of Android slates, and elsewhere. If you’re a fan of Windows and in search of a bulkier device that offers plenty of productivity tools, then the ThinkPad is an option (outside of Microsoft’s superior Surface range of slates).

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Engadget

Sharp screen, worst-in-class battery life

from Engadget

The ThinkPad 8 is indeed a stand-out tablet, but not necessarily for the reasons you think. It has the winningest specs, and yet it should also be the first one you cross off your shopping list. On the one hand, it has a sharp 1,920 x 1,200 screen and up to 128 gigs of storage, but it's also more expensive than any other 8-inch Windows slate, with worst-in-class battery life to match....

More

The ThinkPad 8 is indeed a stand-out tablet, but not necessarily for the reasons you think. It has the winningest specs, and yet it should also be the first one you cross off your shopping list. On the one hand, it has a sharp 1,920 x 1,200 screen and up to 128 gigs of storage, but it's also more expensive than any other 8-inch Windows slate, with worst-in-class battery life to match.

For the money, it doesn't bring extra features, either -- no pen input, no fingerprint reader, no state-of-the-art camera. Realistically, I'd probably be more charitable if it was priced in line with other 8-inch tablets, but even then, it wouldn't be a slam dunk -- not with that tiny battery, anyway. Truth be told, none of the small-screened Windows tabs we've reviewed are perfect, but they all manage to offer a little more value.

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PhoneArena

Compact, light, and responsive

from PhoneArena

We can’t stress enough how the Lenovo ThinkPad 8 has more flexibility than other prized tablets in the space. Giving us that desktop-like experience thanks to Windows 8.1, it has an advantage in the productivity side over other Android tablets and the iPad. Add in its base price point of $4...More

We can’t stress enough how the Lenovo ThinkPad 8 has more flexibility than other prized tablets in the space. Giving us that desktop-like experience thanks to Windows 8.1, it has an advantage in the productivity side over other Android tablets and the iPad. Add in its base price point of $400, it absolutely provides consumers with plenty of value that won’t drain their pockets. In many ways, it’s a fantastic tablet that’s great for fun and work, but we wouldn’t say that it’s something that greatly oversteps traditional laptops in the mobile computing space. Compact, light, and responsive, it has enough of the elements to make it a compelling offering to those who want to travel light – without missing out on the desktop-like experience.

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SlashGear

A solid, well-constructed tablet

from SlashGear

Lenovo has a winner with the ThinkPad 8 -- it's designed in such a way that it feels very portable, yet the quality display and use of Windows 8.1 means it can be used for business tasks that your average Android slate might not be up for. The Quickshot cover is a nice feature, even if it does have a novelty feel to it, allowing those with a habit of snapping pictures using a tablet to take shots without hassle...

More

Lenovo has a winner with the ThinkPad 8 -- it's designed in such a way that it feels very portable, yet the quality display and use of Windows 8.1 means it can be used for business tasks that your average Android slate might not be up for. The Quickshot cover is a nice feature, even if it does have a novelty feel to it, allowing those with a habit of snapping pictures using a tablet to take shots without hassle.

Those looking for a Windows tablet up to the task of performing regular business activities -- writing reports, let's say -- would do better looking elsewhere for no other reason than the relatively small display and aspect ratio. If you're in the market for a portable and well-built Windows tablet, however, that is primarily for casual use but able to handle more robust tasks, the ThinkPad 8 is a choice you won't regret. 

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PCWorld

Fancier CPU and display take a toll on battery life

from PCWorld

Lenovo’s ThinkPad 8 offers many advantages over competing 8 inch Windows tablets, including a faster processor, more storage, and a higher-resolution screen. But it comes up short when it comes to battery life and you’ll want to add a mouse and keyboard for anything more than web browsing and simple email.

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Lenovo’s ThinkPad 8 offers many advantages over competing 8 inch Windows tablets, including a faster processor, more storage, and a higher-resolution screen. But it comes up short when it comes to battery life and you’ll want to add a mouse and keyboard for anything more than web browsing and simple email.

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Techland

A classy Windows tablet, with quirks

from Techland

The bigger problems with the ThinkPad 8 stem from software. It’s not any one particular issue, but a bunch of smaller ones I noticed over time.

Those little annoyances add up, and they hold back the Lenovo ThinkPad 8 from being what should be the best small Windows 8 tablet that money can buy. 

Read full review

The bigger problems with the ThinkPad 8 stem from software. It’s not any one particular issue, but a bunch of smaller ones I noticed over time.

Those little annoyances add up, and they hold back the Lenovo ThinkPad 8 from being what should be the best small Windows 8 tablet that money can buy. 

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BetaNews

The Rolls Royce of small Windows tablets

from BetaNews

This is hands down, the best small Windows tablet created thus far. The screen quality, audio quality -- heck, the overall build quality, are simply amazing. The cameras are above average for a tablet and take passable photos in a pinch.

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This is hands down, the best small Windows tablet created thus far. The screen quality, audio quality -- heck, the overall build quality, are simply amazing. The cameras are above average for a tablet and take passable photos in a pinch.

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Wired

Lenovo has crammed an awful lot of computer into a tiny, unobtrusive package

from Wired

Performance always comes at a price, and in the ThinkPad 8′s case, that price is battery life. I got just 5 hours, 42 minutes of full-screen video in my tests, which is a significant step down from last year’s Windows tablets. What’s more, the unit charges — slowly — via its USB 3.0 connection, and under heavy loads the battery will discharge even while it’s plugged in, as the power-throttled USB connection can’t keep up with the drain. Surprisingly though, even under load the unit only gets mildly warm, far from uncomfortably so...

More

Performance always comes at a price, and in the ThinkPad 8′s case, that price is battery life. I got just 5 hours, 42 minutes of full-screen video in my tests, which is a significant step down from last year’s Windows tablets. What’s more, the unit charges — slowly — via its USB 3.0 connection, and under heavy loads the battery will discharge even while it’s plugged in, as the power-throttled USB connection can’t keep up with the drain. Surprisingly though, even under load the unit only gets mildly warm, far from uncomfortably so.

At $499 as configured, Lenovo as usual is pricing the device at the top end of the category, but the cost isn’t unreasonable. This is one case where the slight premium may very well be worth the few extra bucks.

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Digital Trends

A fantastic tablet, but it’s let down by it’s operating system

from Digital Trends

We sound like a broken record, but this is a great device held back by Windows 8.1. Lenovo has built a fantastic tablet that lives up to its ThinkPad brand, but like the ThinkPad Tablet and ThinkPad Tablet 2, the operating system continues to let us down. The original ThinkPad Tablet ran Android before Android was ready for tablets, and the Tablet 2 ran Windows 8, which still annoys us on small screens (and large)....

More

We sound like a broken record, but this is a great device held back by Windows 8.1. Lenovo has built a fantastic tablet that lives up to its ThinkPad brand, but like the ThinkPad Tablet and ThinkPad Tablet 2, the operating system continues to let us down. The original ThinkPad Tablet ran Android before Android was ready for tablets, and the Tablet 2 ran Windows 8, which still annoys us on small screens (and large).

If you want a small tablet, you may be better off with a competitor like the LG G Pad 8.3 or Nexus 7; both are at least a hundred dollars cheaper than the ThinkPad 8. And there’s always the iPad Mini or iPad Air. Apple’s tablets are still the most flexible and usable around, though they will cost you at least as much as the $400 ThinkPad 8. But if you do want to use Windows on a compact, the ThinkPad 8 is a good option. And if you don’t care about the desktop at all, you could check out Nokia’s Lumia 2520. It gets great battery life.  

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The Verge

More than a tablet, not quite a PC

from The Verge

Three things are true of the Lenovo ThinkPad 8. One, it’s the perfect size for a Windows 8 tablet: it’s easy to hold and use, and Windows 8’s live tiles just suit smaller screens better. Two, it’s easily the best of its kind: for $100 more than the Dell Venue Pro 8, it offers a better screen, more storage, and far superior build quality. For $50 less than the Surface 2, it’s a far better tablet and a more versatile device. If you’re buying a Windows tablet, to be used primarily as a tablet, buy this one...

More

Three things are true of the Lenovo ThinkPad 8. One, it’s the perfect size for a Windows 8 tablet: it’s easy to hold and use, and Windows 8’s live tiles just suit smaller screens better. Two, it’s easily the best of its kind: for $100 more than the Dell Venue Pro 8, it offers a better screen, more storage, and far superior build quality. For $50 less than the Surface 2, it’s a far better tablet and a more versatile device. If you’re buying a Windows tablet, to be used primarily as a tablet, buy this one.

The third thing: I’m not sure you should be buying a Windows tablet. If you want a device to play games, read, and watch movies, Android and iOS offer more options, better battery life, and in most cases lower prices. If you want a device for work, buy a hybrid that’s more laptop than tablet, like the Yoga 2 Pro or the Dell XPS 12. Anything else your device does — working on the iPad, playing games on the ThinkPad 8, using your laptop as a tablet — is extra. A device that does both equally well simply doesn’t exist yet. Use the right tool for the right task, not a $399 jack-of-all-trades that doesn’t do any single thing as well as its competitors. The dream of using a single device for everything is not only not yet achievable, it’s wrongheaded. My computer doesn’t have to be everything because every computer can be mine. That’s a much more exciting dream, and it’s already coming true. 

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Full Specs

Overview
Release date January 31, 2014
Regions available USA, United Kindom
Networks
No cellular data
variations
SIM card Micro-SIM
Dual SIM No
Operating System Windows 8.1

Compare Windows Tablets

Secondary OS No
Processor Intel Z3770 Quad core 2.4 GHz
Internal Flash Memory 32/64/128 GB
RAM 2 GB
ROM No
Digital compass No
Flightmode Yes
Hearing Aid Compatible No
TTY/TDD No
SAR Unknown
Languages English
Manufacturer Warranty 1 Year
Accessories Included AC Charger, Manual
Power & battery
Type Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion)
Battery Capacity 20 WHr
Removable Battery No
Wireless Charging No
Fast Charging No
Battery Charge Time 4 hours
Video Playback Time 8 hours
Wi-Fi Surfing Time 8 hours
3G Surfing Time 8 hours
4G Surfing Time 8 hours
Reading Time No
Standby Time Unknown
Physical Characteristics
Material Plastic
Colors Black
Dimensions [H x W x D] 22.4 x 13.2 x 0.9 cm (8.8 x 5.2 x 0.4 in)
Weight 431 grams
Water Resistant / Waterproof Unknown
Rugged design No
IP Rating No
Display / Screen
Type Color
Technology LCD (IPS)
Colors 16.7 million
Resolution 1200 x 1920 pixels
Pixel density 273 pixels
Size 8.3 inches
3D No
Sensors Ambient Light, Motion / Accelerometer
Graphics Yes
Themes No
Backlit Illumination Yes
Zoom / Magnification Yes
Screen Orientation Lock Yes
Multi-Touch Yes
Fingerprint-Resistant Coating No
Additional Display Features Capacitive touch screen
Input / Navigation
Touchscreen Yes
Sleep / Wake Key Yes
Home Key Yes
Mute Key No
Predictive Text Entry No
Physical keyboard No
Text-to-Speech No
Screen Reader No
Keypad/Screen Lock Yes
External Volume Control Yes
Fingerprint Sensor No
Call Management
Wi-Fi Calling No
Voice over LTE (VoLTE) No
Contact List Capacity No
Multiple Numbers Per Contact No
Contact Groups No
Web / Email / Messaging
Web Browser Yes
Email Client Yes
Email Protocols POP3, IMAP, SMTP, Microsoft Exchange
Additional Email Features -
Messaging No
Connectivity
USB Micro-USB 3.0
USB OTG Support No
Infrared No
Bluetooth 4.0
Bluetooth Profiles A2DP, AVRCP, DUN, OPP/FTP, HID, HFP, HSP, PAN, SYNC, OBEX
WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
WiFi Encryption No
Mobile Hotspot No
WiMAX No
Memory Expansion Slot Yes
Expansion Slot Info MicroSD, MicroSDHC
PC Synchronization Yes
TV Out Yes
DLNA Support No
NFC No
Camera
Main Camera
Aperture
Unknown
Resolution
8+ megapixels
Dual lens
No
Zoom
Yes
Flash
Yes (LED)
Additional Rear Camera Info
Auto focus
Video Recording Formats
3GP / 3GPP, H.264 / AVC, MPEG-4
Video Recording Parameters
Front Camera
Resolution
2+ megapixels
Zoom
Additional Front Camera Info
No
Video Recording Parameters
Audio / Video
Audio Playback Yes
Audio Formats MIDI, MP3, eAAC+, AAC+, AAC, WAV
Radio No
Video Playback Yes
Video Playback Formats 3GP / 3GPP, H.264 / AVC, MPEG-4
Mobile TV No
Streaming Video Yes
External Speakers Stereo
Headset Jack 3.5mm
Custom Ringtones Yes
Vibration Alert Yes
Apps
To-Do / Task List No
Calendar Yes
World Clock No
Alarm Yes
Stop Watch No
Timer No
Calculator Yes
Currency Converter No
Document Viewer Yes
Viewable document types DOC, DOCX, PDF, PPT, PPTX, XLS
Weather Yes
Stocks No
Maps Yes
NotePad Yes
Voice Memos / Recorder Yes
Games Downloadable
Apps Downloadable, Pre-installed
Included Software / Apps Lenovo Companion, Lenovo Support, Lenovo Tap to Display, Lenovo Tap to Share, Lenovo Solution Center
More
Additional comments Variations:

3G/LTE model
Weight: 440 grams (15.5 ounces)
MicroSIM card slot
Related Links Manual (PDF)
Lenovo Thinkpad 8 Reviews
Where to buy Lenovo Thinkpad 8
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